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Monthly Archives: September 2017

Learn the Art of Calligraphy

One of the important characteristics of calligraphy you will learn is that letters have thick and thin parts, which are created by the angle by which you hold your pen with a square cut nib. That’s the part of the pen that comes in various sizes, that you dip into ink or paint. You achieve that by the angle you hold the pen consistently when writing your letters. In copperplate calligraphy, the thick and thin parts of letters are created by placing pressure on the pen nib when writing.

Consistency is the most important characteristic- learning the height, width, slant, serifs, branching and other parts of the letters, and then being able to write them that way every time! That’s where studying, observing and practice comes in. It takes getting used to the pen: holding it at the proper pen angle, how hard you are pressing down (don’t press hard or the ink won’t flow!) and even how much ink you put on the nib. And once you learn about forming letters, then you need to learn about what kind of ink or paint, paper, how to rule paper, proper spacing… on and on.

Don’t get discouraged. It takes time. It’s the same way any professional gets to know their tools- a carpenter using a saw, a plastic surgeon putting in stitches, a great tennis player using their racket! It takes a LOT of hours, and finally years to become a consistent master.

Create Two and Three Compositional Effects In Art

Two and three-dimensional works are much related. For instance, before all three-dimensional works are built and constructed, they are first represented in two-dimensional drawings from various angles and views. This is done to envision how the actual three-dimensional works will look like. Two-dimensional designs give us the platform to analyze and select those aspects of our environment which motivate us to make three-dimensional arts.

The relationship or similarities between two and three-dimensional forms are easily recognized in the identification, selection, and examination of visual information derived from the environment, the exploration and the use of tools and materials in producing artifacts as well as the feeling that arouses in us when we see the finished artwork.

A problem needs to be identified that would require the production of a three-dimensional art form. For example, there is the need of a leather clutch bag to house some items used by an artist. Several observations of both natural and manmade objects found in the environment are made to accrue ideas for the designing of the clutch bag. Through the various stages of idea development of the natural or manmade object selected, several designs are obtained through additions and subtractions of the parts of the original design. Recall maintaining the original concept or main parts of the original design while going through the various stages in idea development. The appropriate design that demonstrates the artist’s ingenuity or creativity and best addresses the problem identified are selected.

The final sketch of the design is drawn in a two-dimensional form showing various views of the design. This paves the way for the building of the actual clutch bag with the appropriate tools and materials thus leather in a solid three-dimensional form.

There are series of activities that are involved in both two and three-dimensional compositions. These are:

1. Visual investigation: This refers to the exploration of the visual world through keen and critical observation of nature with the eye. These explorations of the eye are put on paper in the form of drawing whether in two or three-dimensional composition.

2. Learning of skills: Skills in production processes are essential in both two and three-dimensional compositions. For instance, a skill in layout designing is required in all compositions be it two or three dimensions.

3. Problem-solving: Both two and three-dimensional compositions are made with the view of addressing or solving an identified problem. Finished works of art are produced as a result in arresting those problems.

Tempera Painting

Tempera paintings appear to have originated in classical times. There are references to this sort of painting throughout Latin, Greek and ancient Egyptian literature. Numerous important works of art were said to have been made using this medium, so it appears that was quite popular with artists of the time. Some examples of tempera painting from antiquity do survive, such as the ‘Severan Tondo,’ which is a portrait of Septimus Severus, the Roman emperor. After the collapse of the Roman Empire, tempera gradually overtook encaustic as the main painting medium. Encaustic painting is the technique of adding heated beeswax to coloured pigments. Tempera painting became wildly popular throughout Europe and Asia and was favoured by many top artists. However, with the advent of oil painting in the 16th century, tempera painting gradually became less popular, though it is still favoured by some and enjoys revivals from time to time.

One of the main properties of tempera paint is that it’s not a flexible painting medium. What this means is that it needs to be applied to solid surfaces; wood panels were commonly used, for example. If it is applied to a softer surface, such as a canvas, it will end up cracking. This paint medium dries very quickly and the colours stay the same over time. Tempera paint can’t be applied in really thick layers, so it can’t produce the same richness of colour that oil paints can. Artists have to work with tempera paint quite quickly as once it’s been prepared, it can’t be stored and has to be used up.

Dusting Paintings

To safely and effectively dust a painting, you should use an artist’s brush with natural hair. The bristles should be soft and, most importantly, completely clean. Never use dust cloths because the threads can be caught by raised bits of paint. Avoid using stiff bristle brushes or feather dusters because these can quite easily scratch the painted surface. You should never dust a painting with anything that’s moist, otherwise you run the risk of the paint becoming discoloured or even falling off the canvas. Finally, ensure that anything with chemicals on it never comes into contact with the painting. If you’ve been using an old cloth to dust a painting, for example, that old cloth may very well have polish on it, which can cause paint to fall away from the painting.

To dust your painting, make sure your painting is propped up and have it leaning forward a bit. By having the painting at a forward angle, the dust is going to fall away from the painting on to the floor. Get your brush and go over the painting slowly, lightly and gently. Either work horizontally or vertically. Once you’ve gone over the painting once, go over it again just to be sure you’ve got all the dust off. If you’re dusting the painting’s frame, you should go about it the same way. With the frame, you don’t have to just use a brush; instead you can use a soft cloth or something similar. It’s very important that you don’t apply water or any chemicals to the frame.